Why Palin will never be president. Volume 56,711

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010 @ 7:40 pm | Politics

I thought that the Fed writing itself a check for a trillion dollars would be scrupulously ignored by the usual band of free market theologians just as they did with TARP and the take-overs of AIG and GM (IOKIYAR) but Red State pinup girl Sarah Palin couldn’t let an opportunity to use the words “Keynesian” and “bad” in the same canned tirade go to waste:

“We shouldn’t be playing around with inflation,” Palin, who is widely seen as a prospective 2012 Republican presidential candidate, said in remarks prepared for a Monday speech in Phoenix.”We don’t want temporary, artificial economic growth bought at the expense of permanently higher inflation, which will erode the value of our incomes and our savings. We want a stable dollar combined with real economic reform. It’s the only way we can get our economy back on the right track.”

What does that even mean, anyway?

Inflation is the least of our worries right now and there’s no sign that it’s going to be an issue in the future. That is unless you’re a paid shill for Goldline or some other house of ill repute looking to cash in on the paranoia of rubes.

And what’s with the Keynes bashing by all of the mouth breathers? Bernanke is as much of an adherent to Milton Friedman as he is Maynard Keynes. The idea of “quantitative easing” by the Fed is pure Friedman: shrinking interest rates even further by buying back its own government issued bonds so characterizing Bernanke as this Kool-Aid drunk, pump-primer is at odds with reality. The stimulus package was Keynesianism. QE is all Friedman.

All is not lost though. Even true-believers like Rand Paul do 180 degree turnarounds when they get into the big chair. I just noticed today that he’s actually come out in defense of congressional earmarks. This is the party that’s supposed to make serious budget decisions?

-mg

14 Responses to “Why Palin will never be president. Volume 56,711”

  1. ladk Says:

    QE is all Friedman.

    Still doesn’t mean people can’t bitch about it. It’s one of Friedman’s worst ideas that gets thrown around to this day and he caught a load of rightly deserved flack for this position.

    Where in that article did Palin bring up Keynesians and how they’re bad if you don’t mind my asking?

    All is not lost though. Even true-believers like Rand Paul do 180 degree turnarounds when they get into the big chair. I just noticed today that he’s actually come out in defense of congressional earmarks. This is the party that’s supposed to make serious budget decisions?

    He only came out in defense of earmarks for his own state, which is still against his previous statements yes, but he’s not for all earmarks. Just the ones that would benefit the taxpayers of Kentucky.

    Even though he’s come out in support of earmarks for the people who have paid into the system that doesn’t invalidate his entire stance on spending.

  2. mike g Says:

    Yeah. after thinking about what I quoted last night it didnt include any mention of Keynes. But I you follow the link to her “prepared remarks” (meaning somebody else wrote it) she expends some energy bitching about pump-priming.

    So you’re giving Paul a pass on earmarks because they’re only for his own state? As opposed to what? Bringing money back to your
    constituents is the essence of earmarks.

  3. Henry Whistler Says:

    He only came out in defense of earmarks for his own state, which is still against his previous statements yes, but he’s not for all earmarks. Just the ones that would benefit the taxpayers of Kentucky.

    ladk proves he will say anything.

  4. ladk Says:

    she expends some energy bitching about pump-priming.
    Hasn’t the Fed been describing QE2 as a pump priming situation?

    So you’re giving Paul a pass on earmarks because they’re only for his own state? As opposed to what? Bringing money back to your
    constituents is the essence of earmarks.

    I give him a pass for that because that’s what he’s supposed to do as an elected representative for the state of Kentucky. He’s supposed to go out and get some of the money back that his constituents put into the system. Otherwise he’s failing them.

    He’ll still probably vote NO on his own earmarked bill if it comes up for a vote though. His dad does that too.

    And let’s be honest, Earmarks are not what is breaking the bank with this government. They’re are a minuscule problem when you look at the rest of the federal budget.

  5. Henry Whistler Says:

    Yes, of course they are! That’s why Republican babbling about earmarks (which exploded during their reign in the 00’s, incidentally) is such fluff. It’s something that sounds bad when it’s going to somebody else’s state, so it provides emotional satisfaction and a placeholder for actual spending cuts.

    Rand Paul naturally targeted them during his campaign to get votes, and then the second he’s in office he completely reverses himself. It just highlights the cynicism all the more. He couldn’t even stick to a spending cut promise that wasn’t even impactful to begin with. How’s he going to do on more serious challenges?

  6. ladk Says:

    Rand Paul naturally targeted them during his campaign to get votes, and then the second he’s in office he completely reverses himself. It just highlights the cynicism all the more. He couldn’t even stick to a spending cut promise that wasn’t even impactful to begin with. How’s he going to do on more serious challenges?

    He’s a politician. It’s going to happen. You really expect to hold republicans to a higher standard than you hold democrats?

  7. Sickofspin Says:

    Despite the Fed now monetizing the nation’s debt, the idiot liberals at the Iowa Liberal quipped the following: “Inflation is the least of our worries right now and there’s no sign that it’s going to be an issue in the future.”

    Apparently “mg” of the Iowa Liberal doesn’t do any grocery shopping or pump gas.

  8. Henry Whistler Says:

    LOLZ…Thayer repeats Palin-isms.

    No, dipshit, we do both. Grocery and gas have been stable for quite some time now. It’s been a long time since I’ve seen $4 gas.

  9. Jldmeyer Says:

    Ah yes. The price of gasoline and groceries has skyrocketed since Obama became president. I now dub the situation:

    “No-bama Cash or Credit”
    “Barack It Now You Bought It”
    “Obama-PriceCheck on Aisle America”

    I can play this blame Obama for something that has nothing to do with the federal government game too. Did you notice that the Dallas Cowboys have produced absolutely no offense since 2008? It seems like Jerry Jones is spending a whole lot more money and getting a whole lot less out of his dollar. Their coach just had his job eliminated. It just goes to show those dollars aren’t creating new jobs. Obama is a failure and he is not only taking America down the crapper but also “America’s Team” as well.

  10. Sickofspin Says:

    Gee what a surprise Whistler, you’re either in denial or are lying again…..

    CPI data shows that the price of butter increased by 19.1 percent during the 12 months ended Sept. 30, 2010, while the price of bacon rose by 15.7 percent and milk increased by 8.3 percent.

    EIA data shows that the average price of gasoline in the Midwest is up 10% over this period last year. The average price for a gallon of gas is currently around $2.89.

    This is just the beginning folks. Iowa Liberal is in denial in writing, “Inflation is the least of our worries right now and there’s no sign that it’s going to be an issue in the future.”

  11. Henry Whistler Says:

    Nice selective quoting, arsehole. Overall grocery prices stayed the same. Picking a few that went up so that you can keep waving your Sarah Palin #1 flag is just a cheap trick.

    You’ve yet to provide any numbers that really illustrate inflation is going to be a huge problem. Consider the price increases of health care, college and home ownership during the Bush years, the price of bacon and milk are well manageable.

  12. ladk Says:

    The only thing that I worry about in regards to food pricing is that we, the world, have a very big food shortage going on right now.

    Yet, one of the big things that a lot of Democrats in Washington push is more ethanol production to reduce our energy dependence on foreign oil. They do that by giving huge subsidies to the corn lobby which inevitably makes corn as a food product more expensive as more and more of that particular item is being used to produce fuel.

    Meanwhile people around the world in under developed nations are going to starve because of this. It’s a shame.

  13. Sickofspin Says:

    You go right ahead and continue resorting to the lame namecalling and denial…… what good that will do you….

    Folks, the government has data demonstrating inflation and Whistler says it’s a cheap trick.

    Without question the prices for staples are up. Without question the price for fuel is up.

    As a reminder, Whistler supports the following Iowa Liberal statement: “Inflation is the least of our worries right now and there’s no sign that it’s going to be an issue in the future.”

    There are BIG signs there, Whistler just doesn’t want to look at them. It’s just the beginning folks, pay attention to inflation. The fed is monetizing the debt and when countries play with their currency like this, big jumps in inflation is the result.

    Whistler’s response? Denial.

  14. Henry Whistler Says:

    ladk: Oh, we hate ethanol. Even though it puts money in my family’s pocket, it’s a waste of time for the country’s energy needs.

    Thayer: http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9JEQV6G0.htm

    Turkey and the trimmings won’t cost much more this year than last, according to the Virginia Farm Bureau, but some Virginians think the estimate is missing some important ingredients for a feast.

    The bureau says it should cost $43.39 to serve a 16-pound turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes, rolls, cranberries and peas for 10 adults. The price also includes a tray of carrots and celery, as well as pumpkin pie with whipped cream.

    Virginia officials say its survey of grocery stores indicates all that food will cost on average 1 cent more this year than it did last year, when the cost of Thanksgiving dinner fell for the first time in three years.

    In comparison, the American Farm Bureau said the average national cost of Thanksgiving dinner this year is $43.47, a 56-cent price increase from last year.

    It’s hilarious. Sarah Palin and Glenn Beck say something stupid, and you guys line right up.

    Prices have gone up less this year than previous years. They’ve barely inched up this year, and you guys are convinced that we’re Zimbabwe. What mewling babies.

    Oh, hey, Thayer, did you notice something? I didn’t edit out 80% of your comment. I’m the honest one here, you’re the proven plagiarist and crooked editor.